Think Globally, Act Locally | Create a multi-ended story

Discover the power of storytelling in addressing climate grief and
create a multi-ended story where the reader chooses the
destiny of the planet.

Suitable for ages 7+

'Stories are a way we can empathise with someone else's experience ... feel connected and know that we could be similarly understood.' Storytelling at People's History Museum

Storytelling can help!

Storytelling is a powerful tool to help us communicate with other people.  It can bring facts and ideas to life, and challenge existing beliefs.

Writing can encourage us to talk about difficult emotions and make big problems feel more manageable.

A multi-ended story allows the reader to make choices which result in different endings.  In terms of climate change, this helps us to see how our actions can impact the planet.

'The potential to lose so much gives me an overwhelming feeling of fear.' Young person, Wigan. Image courtesy of People's History Museum

Do you ever feel worried about the future?

You are not alone.  There is even a term to describe it: climate grief.

Never ignore these feelings, they won’t go away on their own.

  • Talk to others about how you are feeling, you will probably find they feel the same.
  • Start to make simple changes to your life.  Could you recycle more?  Walk instead of using the car or the bus?  Look to join or set up a local environmental group?

Creating your multi-ended story

Step by step guide

Multi-ended story step by step @ People's History Museum

This guide will help you to write your story in four simple steps.

Step by step guide

Story template

Multi-ended story template. Image courtesy of People's History Museum

A flowchart helps to plan how your story will develop.

Story template

Writing inspiration

Multi-ended story writing inspiration by People's History Museum

A selection of fun writing activities to help you unleash your imagination.

Writing inspiration

Our Children's World Held In Our Hands banner - multi-ended story inspiration

What can you see?  This banner made in 1996 shows two versions of the world, on the left hand side biodiversity is thriving, and on the right hand side it is dying.

(Biodiversity: a term for all living things and their habitats.)

What do you think the message is?  ‘Our Children’s World Held In Our Hands’ tells us it is in our power to save the planet if we make changes now.

What choices do we make that would see the world ending up like either side of image on the banner?  For example we could use a reusable water bottle or one made of single use plastic.

Our Children's World Held In Our Hands banner, 1996. Image courtesy of People's History Museum
PHM Logo

A multi-ended story written by Atherton Youth Voice and Wigan Youth Cabinet

Story writing with Peoples History MuseumA seemingly ordinary day takes an unusual turn, with a little help from a mysterious character!

This multi-ended story was inspired by the Our Children's World Held In Our Hands banner in the museum's collection, pictured above.

Part of the Think Globally, Act Locally project, 2021.

Read their story
What a Difference a Day Makes. Story written by Atherton Youth Voice and Wigan Youth Cabinet @ People's History Museum
Find out more about climate change

Space to Imagine, Time to Act

13 May 2021, Radical Late online with People's History Museum - 'Space to Imagine, Time to Act' visual minutes. Image © temjam.com

May 2021’s Radical Late was an evening of discussion, talks and workshops, bringing our worries, hopes and ideas together to help us tackle the climate crisis and climate grief.

‘Space to Imagine, Time to Act’ was a topic discussed and captured through visual minutes by artist Temujen Gunawardena.

Suitable for ages 11+

See the discussion come to life

Climate Change is a Justice Issue

13 May 2021, Radical Late online with People's History Museum - 'Climate Change is a Justice Issue' visual minutes. Image © temjam.com

May 2021’s Radical Late was an evening of discussion, talks and workshops, bringing our worries, hopes and ideas together to help us tackle the climate crisis and climate grief.

‘Climate Change is a Justice Issue’ was a topic discussed and captured through visual minutes by artist Temujen Gunawardena.

Suitable for ages 11+

See the discussion come to life

Build a window farm

Hydroponics experiment by artist Colette Whittington. Image courtesy of People's History Museum

Make a hydroponic experiment to build your own window farm.  Recycling a plastic drink bottle with a bit of fabric and some gravel, get your first crop planted.

Suitable for ages 7+

Get growing

Blogpost by youth activist, Lillia

Lillia on her 10th birthday © @lilliasworld

A blog post by ten year old Lillia about what’s at stake and how she is standing up for climate justice.

Suitable for ages 7+

Read and subscribe

Student Guide to the Climate Crisis

Student Guide to the Climate Crisis © Marion Smith and Pooja Kishinani, Climate Emergency Manchester

Created by Marion Smith and Pooja Kishinani, members of Climate Emergency Manchester.

Suitable for ages 16+

Download the handbook

WWF film screening resource

David Attenborough: A Life On Our Planet film screening poster

Find everything you need to host a successful screening of the film David Attenborough: A Life On Our Planet in your local community.

Suitable for ages 18+

Find out more

Project funded by EDRF, URBACT, C-Change

European Regional Development Fund logo URBACT logo C-Change logo

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