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All roads lead to PHM

29 May 2021

A Clarion bicycle. Copyright unknown

Callum White, PHM Senior Visitor Services

All roads lead to PHM

The boom in cycling last year saw more people than ever hopping on the saddle.  We asked avid cyclist and PHM’s Senior Visitor Services’ Callum White to share six tried and tested routes to PHM from around Manchester.

Do you cycle around Manchester?  Perhaps you’re like members of the historic Clarion cycling club, who enjoyed cycling while discussing radical history.  Or maybe you’re simply just trying to cut down on those pesky carbon emissions.  Whatever the reason, be reassured that cycling to People’s History Museum (PHM) is easier than ever. In this handy guide, we’ll show you how to cycle to the museum from various parts of Greater Manchester.

From Stockport:

40 minute cycle / 7.5 miles from Stockport

Stockport’s old village market. Image www.pinterest.co.uk

  • The route from Stockport to Manchester is a fairly simple one.
  • From Stockport town centre join onto the A6 and head in the direction of Manchester.
  • This will take you through Levenshulme and then Longsight.
  • After going through Longsight you can take a left to go down the road Plymouth Grove.
  • Follow this road and turn left across Upper Brook Street to join onto the Oxford Road Corridor where you should see the University of Manchester.
  • Simply follow this road into Manchester and head into Spinningfields, where you will find the museum on the corner of Bridge Street and Left Bank, on the edge of the River Irwell.

From Didsbury:

32 minute cycle / 5.9 miles from Didsbury

West Didsbury. Image courtesy of ilovemanchester.com

  • The route from the leafy suburb of Didsbury is probably the best route in terms of cycling infrastructure as nearly all of it features cycle lanes.
  • If you’re coming from neighbouring areas it’s a good idea to join this route where you can.
  • From Didsbury Village head towards Manchester on Palatine Road which will lead you onto Wilmslow Road.
  • Follow Wilmslow Road through Withington, Fallowfield, Rusholme, and then through the Oxford Road Corridor which leads into central Manchester.
  • Simply follow this road into Manchester and head into Spinningfields, where you will find the museum on the corner of Bridge Street and Left Bank, on the edge of the River Irwell.

From Sale, Trafford:

30 minute cycle/ 5.7 miles from Sale, Trafford

Waterside. Image courtesy of Waterside. Credit left & right Jason Lock & David Oates

  • The route from Sale and the Trafford area is well connected to Manchester city centre, though due to the surrounding cycling infrastructure it’s best to only take this journey if you’re confident on your bike.
  • We suggest you start at the Waterside in Sale and take the Bridgewater Canal path from outside the building to Stretford and then pick up the A56 road through Sale and into Manchester.
  • Once in Manchester head towards Deansgate/Spinningfields and then onto Bridge Street, where you will see the museum on the corner of Bridge Street and Left Bank, on the edge of the River Irwell

From Eccles, Salford:

25 minute cycle / 4.2 miles from Eccles, Salford

St Mary’s Parish Church, Eccles. Image wiki media.org

  • The route from Eccles and the Salford area is fairly straightforward and features some good stretches of cycle lanes.
  • Take Eccles New Road towards Manchester.  This road runs alongside the tram into Manchester.
  • You can go straight on to Regent Road which will lead you on to Trinity Way and then into Spinningfields where the museum is located.
  • Or you can avoid Regent Road (as it’s a busy road, though it does feature a dedicated cycle lane) by taking a small diversion on to Liverpool Street which runs parallel to Regent Road – which will lead you on to Trinity Way and then into Spinningfields where the museum is located, on the corner of Bridge Street and Left Bank, on the edge of the River Irwell.

From Ashton-under-Lyne, Tameside:

38 minute cycle / 7.4 miles from Ashton-under-Lyne, Tameside

Portland Basin Panorama. Image courtesy of Marketing Manchester

If you’re coming from Ashton-under-Lyne and the Tameside area there are two options:

  • The first is to take the A635 from Ashton-under-Lyne all the way into Manchester city centre.
  • The second option is a more pleasant one but takes much longer; from Ashton-under-Lyne find the Ashton Canal and head towards Manchester.
  • This canal roughly runs parallel to the A635 and leads all the way into Manchester and you can get off it at Ancoats.
  • Follow signs for Deansgate/Spinningfields and then head towards Bridge Street where you will see the museum on the corner of Bridge Street and Left Bank, on the edge of the River Irwell.
  • A word of warning; the canal can be tricky to navigate in winter due to wet stone and ice, so always be careful to consider the weather and temperature before your journey.

From Oldham:

38 minute cycle / 8.1 miles from Oldham

Statue of Oldham suffragette Annie Kenney. Image courtesy of aboutmanchester.co.uk

It’s possible to cycle from Oldham, although the journey is quite a long one!

  • Starting from Oldham town centre head towards the A62 which will take you all the way to Ancoats.
  • Follow signs for Deansgate/Spinningfields and then head towards Bridge Street where you will see the museum on the corner of Bridge Street and Left Bank, on the edge of the River Irwell.
  • A little advice for this route; while a lot of it has cycle lanes it is still a road with a high volume of traffic, so it might be preferable for the more experienced cyclist.
  • If you haven’t already, make sure to visit the statue of famous Oldham suffragette Annie Kenney!  You’ll also find lots of information on the suffrage movement at PHM

Once you’ve arrived at the museum, there are bike racks to lock your bike outside the entrance to Open Kitchen Cafe & Bar at PHM located on Bridge Street.

If you experience any issues, don’t hesitate to give us a bell (a telephone call that is, not your bike bell!) on 0161 838 9190 and PHM staff will be more than happy to assist you in reaching the museum.

The whole museum is open to explore the past, present, and future of ideas worth fighting for, throughout Family Friendly galleries, new exhibitions, an archive and shop.

And don’t miss Open Kitchen Cafe & Bar! Enjoy a sustainable, ethical and delicious new food experience.

We look forward to welcoming you soon.

If you want to share your own ride to Manchester city centre, head over to our Instagram Stories feed and during Bike Week 2021 (30 May – 5 June) see Callum’s favourite and add your own.


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