People's History Museum blog

PHM is the national museum of democracy, telling the story of its development in Britain: past, present, and future.

On this blog we share posts from the PHM team and other experts, with behind the scenes stories, coverage of PHM's exhibitions, events, and Learning Programme, and highlights from the museum's unique collection.

Posts tagged 'Women'

Grunwick strike poster, 1977 © Dan Jones

Going back to Grunwick

10 June 2020


PHM’s Programme Officer, Zofia Kufeldt puts the spotlight on a Grunwick strike poster from 1977.



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Grunwick Strike Committee banner, 1976 at People's History Museum

A patient banner and the problem with plastic

6 March 2020


People’s History Museum houses the world’s largest collection of trade union and political banners.  In this month’s blog, our Conservator, Kloe Rumsey shines a light on the conservation work she undertook to prepare a previously unseen banner for our 2020 Banner Exhibition.



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Happy and Proud project banners and bags, designed and made by project participants on display at Burnley Mechanics and the National Trust’s Gawthorpe Hall ©Participation Works NW

Marion Wallace Dunlop: History inspires success in Burnley

5 July 2019


#OnThisDay in 1909 suffragette Marion Wallace Dunlop went on hunger strike whilst imprisoned for militancy.  She became one of the first and most well known to do so and her tactics were to inspire the likes of Ghandi.

We asked Lynne Blackburn, Director & Project Manager at Participation Works NW to share a recent project which saw a group of girls from Burnley inspired for their futures by struggles that women in the past faced.



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The Belle-alliance, or the Female Reformers of Blackburn!!! print, 1819 (detail) © People's History Museum

The women of Peterloo

4 March 2019


To celebrate International Women’s Day, we’ve invited our former colleague and the National Trust’s new Programme Curator of National Public Programmes Helen Antrobus to blog for us.

Helen is a specialist in the history and collections relating to 20th century radical women; from the women who marched at Peterloo, to the female Chartists; those involved with the women’s suffrage movement, to the first female MPs, and shares with us her insight into the women at Peterloo.



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Rose Lamartine Yates’ tea cup and plate © People's History Museum

Suffragette tea set on display at People’s History Museum

18 December 2018


To complement the public display of a suffragette tea set designed by Sylvia Pankhurst we asked Dr Alexandra Hughes-Johnson, suffrage historian and Women in the Humanities Research Co-ordinator at the University of Oxford, for the story of its former owner, suffragette Rose Lamartine Yates (1875-1954).

Until recently Rose Lamartine Yates has remained a relatively unknown figure in the history of the women’s suffrage movement and despite attempts by historians Elizabeth Crawford, Gillian Hawtin and Gail Cameron to shed light onto Rose’s suffrage career, she is often still remembered for her friendship with the Emily Wilding Davison and her role as the first guard of honour to her coffin at Emily’s funeral on the 14 June 1913.



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